Update: 08 October 2018, What should you know about moving to Spain with six months to Brexit?

Spain Property Guides has had questions from some of our readers who are worried about Brexit impacting their chances of buying a home in Spain. Fortunately, the answer is that property isn’t affected by Brexit – so you can continue your plans safe in the knowledge that you can still buy here.

Brexit doesn’t impact property

Whether you’re allowed to own property or not in Spain isn’t controlled by the European Union. It is sometimes simpler in terms of paperwork, but ‘third-country nationals’ can still easily buy a home here. The government actively encourages investment, in fact. Plus, many non-EU nationals, like Australians and Americans, can still stay in Spain for three months without a visa – so there’s no reason the same won’t apply to UK citizens.

Proving you live in Spain

If you do move to Spain before Brexit and want to avoid any doubt over your right to live here full-time, it’s a good idea to get yourself registered. Find out how to do so in our article on registration in Spain.

Update: 24 September 2018, “No deal” advice through from government on pet travel and car insurance.

The UK government’s provided information on what we can expect in the case of a “no deal” Brexit for pet transport and car insurance.

UK nationals would need proof of third-party car insurance

If we leave the European Union without a deal, the UK will no longer be part of the ‘Green Card-free circulation area’. This means motorists will need to carry a Green Card to show proof of having car insurance. Normally, you should be able to request one from your insurance provider for free.

Motorists should expect documentation checks to take place upon entry to the Green Card-free area.

This is subject to agreements being reached between the UK Motor Insurers’ Bureau and those of other relevant countries.

“No deal” means live animals will require an EHC

Unless other rules are negotiated, anyone bringing a live animal from the UK – which will be outside the EU – into the EU will have to have an Export Health Certificate, signed by a vet or other authorising authority. They will have to go through an inspection process by Border Inspection Post and, after the inspection, the EHC would need to be signed by an ‘Official Veterinarian’.

For animals to be allowed to be exported to the EU, the UK would need to achieve ‘third-country’ status. If not, all exports would cease. However, other countries such as Australia have this status, so it seems likely.

Update: September 2018, Government offers “no deal” advice on passports, driving and roaming charges.

The UK government has announced what we can expect when travelling, driving and using mobiles in the EU after Brexit if the UK and EU don’t agree to a deal.

UK nationals may need at least three months’ validity on passports

UK citizens after Brexit will be considered as third-country nationals, ie as non-EU citizens. UK nationals entering a Schengen country (any EU country apart from Cyprus, Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia) will need to check their passports meet these conditions:

  • Have an issue date no more than ten years before the date of entering a Schengen country
  • Have at least three months before the passport expires

Third-country nationals can stay in a Schengen country for three months. As such, the government advises that the second requirement may in fact be for six months, to cover those three months within the Schengen area.

Roaming charges will fall to commercial decision-makers

If the UK exits the EU without a deal, it’ll be outside of the ‘Roam like at home’ rules. These allow EU citizens to use their data in any other EU country the same as in their home country.

UK operators will no longer be under the EU regulations if there’s no deal. This means they’ll be free to set their own surcharges – so it’ll come down to a commercial decision. However, Vodafone, EE, 3 and O2 have all confirmed they don’t have any intention to increase surcharges. Other operators have yet to commit.

UK licences may no longer be valid in the EU

The UK government has confirmed that UK driving licences may no longer be valid in the EU, if there is no deal agreed. In this case, the rules would default to International Driving Permits (IDP). The same as when UK citizens drive outside the EU, they’d have to apply for one of these before being able to drive.

There are two types of IDP.

The 1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic governs the first type. After the UK exits the EU, they would be valid in Ireland, Malta, Spain and Cyprus. They last for 12 months.

The second type is governed by the 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic. The IDPs from this convention are valid for three years in all EU countries apart from those listed above. It’d also be valid in Norway and Switzerland.

Currently, the first type is available from the Post Office or directly from private companies. By the time the UK leaves the EU, both will be taken over by the UK government and available from the Post Office. When UK nationals travel to the EU, they’ll need their UK driving licence and IDP.

With Article 50 being triggered, the countdown officially begins to the UK’s exit from the European Union. We don’t know what will be the result of the Brexit negotiations over the next two years. Will the British have a special status, or will we have the same rules as the other non-EU nations?

We don’t know, so this guide runs through a most extreme scenario, where the British have no more right to live and work in Spain than the citizens of any other non-EU country, such as the USA or Australia. We don’t believe Brexit will be as “hard” as this, but if you can work within these rules to live in Spain, when negotiations are complete and we know the reality it will probably be even easier to live there. Download this free guide using the short form below.

The After Brexit Guide will help you plot your way through a possible post-Brexit scenario, to ensure you can fulfil that dream of a wonderful lifestyle combining the best of our two cultures. The guide will help you to answer:


  How does a non-EU person access state healthcare?

  Will I be able to buy residential property in Spain?

  Could I take Spanish citizenship?

And many more important questions.

Download your free After Brexit guide

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We have built a trusted team of experts to help you along the way – experienced estate agents, bilingual lawyers, tax and financial advisors, and expats who have made the move themselves and can share their unique knowledge and experience with you to make sure you have access to information that is not readily available elsewhere. This team includes our expert expat, Sally Veall, who has lived in Spain, France and Italy, and has been through the process of buying overseas property herself, so is well placed to guide you through the various pitfalls and offer tips to make the most of your property purchase and life in Spain. Sally writes free newsletters and articles for our readers, covering all aspects of buying, moving and living in Spain.

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In addition to our Resource Centre in London, we have a dedicated team based in the Spain Property Guide offices in Cala de Mijas, on the beautiful Costa del Sol, are here to help make your Spanish property purchase is a success. Both experienced teams can help answer any questions and offer advice on the different aspects of buying property in Spain, here to support you before and after you travel to Spain, and are on hand to share their knowledge of your chosen region of Spain and connect you to the right professionals to meet your particular needs.

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