We chat to expats in Ireland about their recommended tactics for making friends when you move to Ireland.

 

It’s all very well upping sticks and leaping across the sea to Ireland, but having helped thousands make the move before you, we understand just how important socialising is to a successful emigration. Adults are stubborn creatures, and can be stuck in their ways, so to make connections in Ireland, you may have to employ some new tactics. Today the Ireland Buying Guide chats to expats who’ve made the move about how they went in search of friends when they first arrived in Ireland…

“We made it our business to introduce ourselves to those running the pub, the shop and the cafe, as well as those frequenting the same places as us, and soon found people were very interested to hear where we were from and what we were doing in Ireland.”

Angela Dean moved with her husband John to a village an hour east of Galway in the summer of 2015…

“As our wonderful new property is located in the middle of the countryside, it did slightly concern John and me that we might struggle to meet people in the local area. We solved this by finding the nearest village and making it our base for picking up bits and pieces, and enjoying drinks and dinner. We made it our business to introduce ourselves to those running the pub, the shop and the cafe, as well as those frequenting the same places as us, and soon found people were very interested to hear where we were from and what we were doing in Ireland. Now when we head out, we’re never short of someone to enjoy a drink with – and that’s all we need really!”

 

happy-friends-drinking-beer-at-counter-in-pub

Much of Ireland’s socialising happens in local pubs. Don’t be afraid to spark up conversation!

 

After the death of his wife in 2014, Phillip Clarkson decided to fulfil their shared dream of moving to Ireland…

For me, making friends came easily as I sought out the things that I enjoy, sport, and that was all the common ground I needed to strike up a conversation.

“Having lost Christine, it was doubly important for me to make the effort to meet people when I moved to Ireland. Fortunately, I’m sport’s mad – and so are the Irish. I threw myself into going to watch the local hurling team, and would enjoy a beer or two in the bar afterwards where the lads were more than happy to run through the rules with me. They couldn’t have been more welcoming. I also joined the local golf club, and went along to local football fixtures. For me, making friends came easily as I sought out the things that I enjoy, sport, and that was all the common ground I needed to strike up a conversation. Plus, I had an excuse to watch and play all the sport I wanted!”

Judy Di Matteo emigrated to just outside of Dublin in 2013…

“I’d always quite fancied having a go at painting, so when I had arrived and settled in, I looked for a class to attend. I had to travel into Dublin, but that was a nice thing to do once a week! My classmates were from all walks of life, and we had a lovely time learning to paint and getting to know each other. I’ve since tried pottery, glass blowing, and silver-smithing. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed trying my hand at all these new skills, and my friends from my first painting class and I regularly get together to paint in pretty locations in and around Dublin. Through the classes, I also found a book club! I saw an advert on the noticeboard in my college and I’ve been expanding my literary horizons for the last year now. It’s one of my favourite discoveries since relocating.”

Download the Ireland Buying Guide today

The Ireland Buying Guide takes you through each stage of the property buying process, with practical recommendations from our experts who have been through the process themselves. The guide will help you to:


  Ask the right questions
  Avoid losing money
  Avoid the legal pitfalls
  Move in successfully

Download your free guide to buying in Ireland

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