Sunny, stylish and incredibly beautiful: it’s easy to see why so many people want to buy property in Lisbon. With tile-clad mansions and pastel palaces set across seven hills, there are miradouros – golden views – round every corner. Add the growing tech, art and nightlife scenes and you have one of Europe’s coolest capital cities.

Discover our top locations to buy property in Lisbon.

Discover our top locations to buy property in Lisbon.

Buying property in Lisbon – a wise investment

Lisbon’s property market is booming at the moment. Portugal’s economy has made an incredible comeback after the economic crisis, and development is at a high. Crumbling mansions are being restored to their former glory, while stylish new buildings – complete with modern amenities – are springing up to fill gap sites. This – combined with increased tourism and rental demand – has pushed prices skywards. Both local and international investors are buying property in Lisbon, and planned infrastructure projects are in place to ensure the city can handle the growth. And, although prices are high, you still get more m2 for your buck Lisbon than in London, Madrid and Berlin.

Lisbon’s property market is booming at the moment. Portugal’s economy has made an incredible comeback after the economic crisis, and development is at a high.

Like all large capital cities, Lisbon has lots of neighbourhoods each with a different feel. Property prices vary across the areas, too. Join us as we find out the best ones to purchase property in for overseas buyers.

Chiado

Príncipe Real

Estrela

Belém

Parque das Nações

Campo de Ourique

Chiado

Chiado sits between the Bairro Alto and the Baixa Pombalina.

Chiado sits between the Bairro Alto and the Baixa Pombalina. Alexandre Rotenberg / Shutterstock.com

Located in the heart of Lisbon, Chiado sits between the buzzing Bairro Alto – with its winding alleys and vibrant nightlife and the Baixa Pombalina – Lisbon’s downtown tourism district. In Chiado you’ll find attractions such as the ruins of the Carmo Monastery, which was destroyed in the 1755 earthquake. It’s also home to the Jardim de São Pedro de Alcântara viewpoint, which has sweeping views across the city centre and over to the castle. Fashionable shops, restaurants and bars round out the offering in this elegant neighbourhood.

Average price: €10,000 /m2

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Príncipe Real

Colorful buildings in Principe Real. Christophe Cappelli / Shutterstock.com

Colorful buildings in Príncipe Real. Christophe Cappelli / Shutterstock.com

One of Lisbon’s most stylish neighbourhoods, Príncipe Real is a short stroll uphill from the Jardim de São Pedro de Alcântara viewpoint. Although it’s central, it still maintains its local atmosphere as few tourists venture this far. It’s known for its tile-clad 19th Century mansions, many of which have been converted into arty shops like the Embaixada – a shopping mall dedicated to local Portuguese designers. Its central park hosts a Saturday farmer’s market and monthly antique fair. Stylish cafes, restaurants and gay bars round out the offering of this evocative area.

Average price: €10,000 /m2

Estrela

The Jardim de Estrela is a popular green spot in this upscale district.

The Jardim de Estrela is a popular green spot in this upscale district.

Lisbon’s embassy quarter sits at the top of one of the city’s seven hills, with incredible views across the Tagus River and the iconic red Ponte 25 de Abril bridge – a clone of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge.  You’ll find young families and elderly locals relaxing and taking in the air at the large, leafy Jardim de Estrela Park. The hub of the neighbourhood is the Basílica da Estrela – you can see its domes from the city centre, and the view from the top is pretty breathtaking. Outside you’ll find the terminus of the famous Tram 28, the vintage yellow street car that trundles through some of Lisbon’s most popular touristic areas.

Average price: €8,800 /m2

Lisbon’s embassy quarter sits at the top of one of the city’s seven hills, with incredible views across the Tagus River and the iconic red Ponte 25 de Abril bridge

Belém

The famous Belém tower.

The famous Belém tower.

The waterfront suburb of Belém is 8km west of Lisbon city centre, but still has a lively atmosphere as it’s home to some of the city’s most iconic attractions and museums. These include Mosteiro dos Jeronimos – a huge monastery and one of the few surviving examples of Manueline architecture – and the Pasteis de Belem pastry shop where the Portuguese custard tart is said to have been invented.

You can still buy in Portugal after 31st October – find out what you need to know in our Guide to Living in Portugal After Brexit.

If you go a few streets inland, away from the museums and open-top tour buses, you’ll find the atmosphere much more peaceful. Although it isn’t connected to the city centre by underground, there are regular trams and buses. Easy access to the waterfront promenade and large leafy parks makes it a choice location for joggers and cyclists.

Average price: €8,800 /m2

Parque das Nações

Parque das Nações is one of the more modern districts of Lisbon. Radu Bercan / Shutterstock.com

Parque das Nações is one of the more modern districts of Lisbon. Radu Bercan / Shutterstock.com

Parque das Nações was built in 2012 and feels more contemporary than the rest of the city. Tourists come for the Lisbon Oceanarium – the largest indoor aquarium in Europe. Leafy parks and a broad promenade are spiced up with public artworks. The area is beside the huge Estação do Oriente, one of Portugal’s main transport hubs. It also has the sprawling Vasco da Gama shopping mall, and numerous waterfront bars and restaurants to enjoy.

The area is also home to the Altice arena, which hosts concerts from interntional acts like Michael Bublé and conferences including Web Summit, a huge tech event which has been held annually in Lisbon since 2016. This makes Parque das Nações an excellent choice if you want to buy property in Lisbon to rent out. 

Average price: €8,100 /m2

Campo de Ourique

The fantastic market in Campo de Ourique. photoshooter2015 / Shutterstock.com

The fantastic market in Campo de Ourique. photoshooter2015 / Shutterstock.com

Campo de Ourique is an up-and-coming neighbourhood slightly the west of downtown Lisbon. It has lots of boutique shops and trendy places to eat – at weekends you’ll spot lines of hipsters queuing for brunch outside cafés like Ela Canela and Amélia. One of the top attractions is its food market, which combines stalls selling fresh fish, fruit and charcuterie with places you can grab street food and petiscos (Portuguese tapas). It’s like a smaller version of the famous Time Out Market in Cais do Sodre, and as fewer people know about it, it’s much quieter and easier to sample everything that’s on offer. 

Average price: €7,500 /m2

Tickets for Your Overseas Home go fast, so make sure to get yours today. It’s a unique kind of property show, especially designed for serious buyers only, and the chance for you to meet and ask questions of experts in Portuguese property, law, finances, currency exchange and more.

Living the Lisbon lifestyle

Buying property in Lisbon gives you the chance to enjoy the relaxed Portuguese lifestyle combined with the buzz of a cosmopolitan city. It’s easy to get around on foot, and the hilly streets are an excellent alternative to joining a gym. That said, there are plenty of gyms in the city – from the cheap no-contract Fitness Hut to posher full-service options like Holmes Place.

While the cost of living is rising, living in Lisbon is still extremely affordable compared to most large cities. Eating and drinking in local tascas is extremely affordable, and you can often find three-course menu del dia options for under €10. Lisbon also has a thriving fine dining scene composed of Michelin star restaurants with experimental chefs whipping up unique tasting menus based on Portuguese classics.

Although there’s plenty for all ages, Lisbon is particularly attractive to expats under 50. A growing number of networking events and meet-ups designed for networking and friendship-building makes it easy to meet people in the city. 

Aside from the odd February thunderstorm, the weather in Lisbon is generally warm and pleasant. There aren’t any urban beaches, but the seaside town of Cascais is a 36 minute drive – or one hour train ride – from the city centre. Lisbon is also perfectly placed for reaching some of Europe’s most beautiful beaches like the Costa da Caparica and the Serra da Arrábida. 

Download your free Portugal Buying Guide

The Portugal Buying Guide is designed to support you through each stage of buying property in Portugal, providing relevant, up-to-date information and tips from Portugal property experts and expats who have been through the process themselves. It helps you to:


  Understand Brexit
  Find your property
  Ask the right questions
  Avoid losing money
  Avoid the legal pitfalls
  Move in successfully

Download your free guide to buying abroad

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